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Did the Romans eat seaweed?
#1
I've been asked by an acquaintance if it's known whether the Romans ever ate seaweed?

I know that there's anecdotal evidence (at least) of them using seaweed medicinally, but my copy of Apicius makes no reference to it being eaten.

Can anyone help?

Thanks in advance.
Ben Kane, bestselling author of the Eagles of Rome, Spartacus and Hannibal novels.

Eagles in the Storm released in UK on March 23, 2017.
Aguilas en la tormenta saldra en 2017.


http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor
Facebook: facebook.com/benkanebooks
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#2
Perhaps enquire of this chap:

http://pass-the-garum.blogspot.com.au/
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#3
Thanks, Moi, I've emailed that blog.
Ben Kane, bestselling author of the Eagles of Rome, Spartacus and Hannibal novels.

Eagles in the Storm released in UK on March 23, 2017.
Aguilas en la tormenta saldra en 2017.


http://www.benkane.net
Twitter: @benkaneauthor
Facebook: facebook.com/benkanebooks
Reply
#4
I am sure there are members of Apicius.org on here. It is a yahoo group that is very knowledgeable about all things dietary gk and roman. they are lovely and share much deep knowledge, recipes, etc

regards
Richard
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#5
Quote:I know that there's anecdotal evidence (at least) of them using seaweed medicinally...

Yes, Pliny's Natural History mentions many of its medicinal uses. See Book 26 Chapter 66, for instance. But he doesn't seem to consider it as a food. Although sometimes he talks about it being ingested, most of its uses appear to be topical.
David J. Cord
http://www.davidcord.com
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#6
This from the Pass The Garum Face Book page:

Interesting question! I'm yet to encounter a seaweed recipe, but that doesn't mean that they never ate the stuff. There is a quote by the Roman poet Horace which reads: "But birth and virtue, unless [attended] with substance, is viler than seaweed." (You can find this here: http://bit.ly/SRIhVo). Whilst he is not talking about eating seaweed, it's interesting to see that he thinks of it as being 'vile'.

https://www.facebook.com/PassTheGarum/po...ment_reply


In a humorous dialogue between Ulysses and Tiresias, he exposes those arts which the fortune hunters make use of, in order to be appointed the heirs of rich old men.

BESIDE what you have told me, O Tiresias, answer to this petition of mine: by what arts and expedients may I be able to repair my ruined fortunes-why do you laugh? Does it already seem little to you, who are practiced in deceit, to be brought back to Ithaca, and to behold [again] your family household gods? 0 you who never speak falsely to any one, you see how naked and destitute I return home, according to your prophecy: nor is either my cellar, or my cattle there, unembezzled by the suitors [of Penelope]. But birth and virtue, unless [attended] with substance, is viler than seaweed.


http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text...ht=seaweed

:wink:

Narukami
David Reinke
Burbank CA
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