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Pass the Garum - Roman Food Blog
#16
Yes, I'm thinking of sourdough. Here is the thread I made when I did the grape juice bread. I basically handled it like one would a sour dough. I just wasn't sure what stage of the process "to prove" applied to.
David J. Cord
http://www.davidcord.com
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#17
Proving bread usually means to let it rest after mixing the ingredents (the key to good pastry too).

I understand that a bread maker's/pastry maker's hands need to be cool and not too warm otherwise it affects the ability of the yeast as an active ingredient. Over handling is also to be avoided. I usually let bread rest with a dampened cloth over it in the coolest place I can find but not the fridge, and certainly away from a warm kitchen. I am more used to using "modern" ingredients though so will certainly bow to those making such old recipes.
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#18
Quote:Proving bread usually means to let it rest after mixing the ingredents (the key to good pastry too).

I understand that a bread maker's/pastry maker's hands need to be cool and not too warm otherwise it affects the ability of the yeast as an active ingredient. Over handling is also to be avoided. I usually let bread rest with a dampened cloth over it in the coolest place I can find but not the fridge, and certainly away from a warm kitchen. I am more used to using "modern" ingredients though so will certainly bow to those making such old recipes.
Huh. Most recipes (taken from flour packets, I have to admit) say to leave it in a warm place - my house has no shortage of cool places at least! Next time I try (spelt flour with modern yeast, rather than the more authentic sourdough) I'll leave it for longer in a cool place.

My inability to make fresh bread that isn't a brick/soggy on the inside is rather depressing for me!
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#19
Like I said, happy to be wrong but I certainly haven't had soggy middled bread for a while. It's very sunjective I suppose. depends on how cool I think cool is as opposed to your warm! :wink:
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#20
Quote:Like I said, happy to be wrong but I certainly haven't had soggy middled bread for a while. It's very sunjective I suppose. depends on how cool I think cool is as opposed to your warm! :wink:
Paul Hollywood (he of Great British Bake Off fame) doesn't specify a temperature at all so clearly I'm over thinking things - he does say it can be left for several hours though. There's a supplement in today's Telegraph by him which also gives a basic method for making sourdough which I'm tempted to follow at some point, although I should probably try to master bread first...
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#21
Quote:Worcestershire sauce seems closer to the original Asian ketchups, in that they are a mix of ingredients for flavour with the fish sauce providing a salty distinctive base. I think Thai fish sauces like Nam Pla are closer to the original garum, although I've not been brave enough to try them in anything other than a stir fry so far.

I wish I could find the source, but someone did a study on garum and determined it was heavily laced with monsodium glutimate (MSG)... not particularly healthy; and along with lead piping may have been one of the reasons Roman genes kinda shriveled. :whistle:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
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#22
Quote: There's a supplement in today's Telegraph by him which also gives a basic method for making sourdough which I'm tempted to follow at some point, although I should probably try to master bread first...

Bother. Missed that!

Alan - was it garum or the fish sauce the study was done on? I think MSG as an additive is relatively new (turn of the 1900s). I've just added the recommended "garum" from the blog and boy does it make a difference to spelt! Much better than soy sauce and although my spelt was softened in strong chicken stock, the subtle change with only a tablespoon of "garum" was very obvious. (Recipe was spelt, canneli beans and diced, salt pork - yummy!)
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#23
Hello, Moi

I once made a "repro" garum from asian fish sauce and anchovy paste. It was EXCELLENT! I used it on "scrooched eggs" and steak... just like we use Worcestershire. Confusedilly:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
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#24
Garum isn't as tangy as W sauce, though, is it?

I only ever use Worcestershire sauce on cheese on toast and in Bloody Marys. I am NOT puting garaum in/on either of those!

(and the only use for celery IMHO is to stir said Bloody Mary... :woot: )
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#25
I like my homemande garum because of the anchovy paste. Confusedilly:

I LOVE anchovies. While in Sicily, I learned how to make "pizza arabica," a pizza topped with fresh tomato sauce, parmasan cheese, anchovies, and capers... the last being the "arabica" part, I think. Supposedly, capers came over from Arab Tunisia, only about 40 miles from Sicilia. Confusedilly:
Alan J. Campbell

member of Legio III Cyrenaica and the Uncouth Barbarians

Author of:
The Demon's Door Bolt (2011)
Forging the Blade (2012)

"It's good to be king. Even when you're dead!"
             Old Yuezhi/Pazyrk proverb
Reply
#26
Just had Parthian chicken and chick peas, recipes from the Pass the Garum blog and although I had to improvise a few ingredients, I really do think garum, or the fish sauce recommended by the blog, makes SUCH a difference to the expected tastes.

The date paste, too, really does add another dimension, particularly with the chicken , and at long last I am actually enjoying cooking again. :-)

Another bonus is that the house smells of delicious herbs and tantalising new smells.

Certainly an easy recipe to follow and certainly worth eating.
Moi Watson

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!
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#27
It's hard not to approach garum/liquamen with certain preconceptions, but really, I think it gets an un-deserved reputation. I LOVE that you are all trying it and discovering how great it can be!

For one, it's not very fishy, but rather a savoury surprise with hints of meat and cheese. It brings the many beautiful herbs and spices in Roman cooking together. It is often said that the Romans over-spiced their food, attempting to hide any bad tastes. I disagree. I find that adding liquamen to a dish helps bring out each ingredient, leading to a journey of flavours.
Check out my Roman food recreation blog at Pass the Garum
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