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Rare ancient artwork and pictures
#31
A Niederbieber/Heddernheim type!

I wonder if the Bucinator is the same as the Tubicen?
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#32
Quote:A Niederbieber/Heddernheim type!
This is (or would be if this bloody system would allow me to attach it) a close-up of the helmet that I took in 1976:

I sent a copy to H. Russell Robinson, suggesting that it looked like a cavalry helmet. He replied, "The helmet is not a cavalry one but a very simplified version of a legionary hat with the brow reinforce run into the back ridges. This is a common error made by sculptors, even the most competent." This is (or would be) his rough sketch of what the helmet should have been:


Quote:I wonder if the Bucinator is the same as the Tubicen?
The short answer is, "No".
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#33
Quote:Finally I found good picture of Severan soldiers wearing Phrygian cap(or Phrygian style shaped helmet):


where did you get a good picture of severan soldiers?
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#34
It should be from Septimius Severus victory arch in Rome.Ive read about some soldiers having these caps on before at this monument but there are almost none good pictures of reliefs from this arch on the internet.Page where I found this only had this one close up and nothing more.
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#35
Statue of the(almost certainly)3rd century Roman soldier from Apulum/Alba Iulia(from fort in Roman Dacia).I only saw relief sculptures(and mosaics with frescoes) of soldiers from this time before but this is first time I see it as free standing statue:


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#36
And again the same Apulum statue:


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#37
And this vexillarius is really interestingly dressed.Unfortunately I dont know from where this is.Prbably 3rd century I guess...


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#38
And one of my favorites because possibly traces of original paint are still visible.Found at Perinthus and now at Istanbul.It is possible that he served in III ITALICA during Persian war of Caracalla or Gordianus III.


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#39
And for me completely new one but much appreciated discovery because it very clearly shows original color of cloak.Now in Greeko-Roman museum at Alexandria.At the same museum other Tombstone exist where color is also preserved for cloak and it is of the same color as here:


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#40
I had no idea Frescoes like this are preserved in Palmyra Idea


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#41
.


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#42
All these tombstones put me in mind of this one, from Aquileia and dated very exactly to (I think) July 28 AD352. It appears the man served in a unit called the Moesiaci, and retired with the honorary rank of protector.

Interestingly, the shield design is very similar to that of the Moesici Seniores in the Notitia Dignitatum. The figure wears a crested Intercisa helmet. He is also wearing a muscle cuirass, or so it appears to me...:

[attachment=11513]Moesiaci1.jpg[/attachment]

In the full image (shown in lower quality here) the subject, whose name is lost, is portrayed three times - once in his military gear and twice in civilian apparel.

A transcription of the text:

Aic(!) ego sum positus Ma[ --- ]/nes natus in Dardani[a cum --- coniuge ---] / qu(a)e vixit annos bis qua[ternos mecum sine ull]/a querella in pace decessi [--- Septembr]/es IAOS annis tricinta(!) / et quinque ex/x(!) tri(bunis) [or "exxibi"] ex pr(o)tecto/ribus depositus / situs(!) diem quintu(m) Kalenda/s A(u)gustas c[o]nsules(!) / Decentio Caesa/ri et <P>aulo / consulibus

[EDIT] - the diagonal belt worn very high on the chest rather resembles the curious arrangement shown in de rebus bellicis...)


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#43
This tombstone (one of those posted by Pavel) is CIL XIII, 7583 and commemorates C. Iulius Clemens, a veteran who died at the age of 60, and his son C. Iulius Sabinus, a centurion in Coh. II Raetorum C.R. Sabinus was aged 25, which is remarkably young for a centurion but there is no doubt about the reading.

http://www.ubi-erat-lupa.org/imagelink/i...hp?Nr=7079
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#44
From 6th century Vienna Genesis manuscript.Dont you know if there is some page with all illuminations from it digitalized?Same question for the second pic(with nice glimpse of Justinianic vexilla )from Rossano Gospels.


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#45
Desk paintings of the soldier God Heron from Egypt.

First is claimed to be of sixth century date by page I got it from but this seems highly unlikely to me and first half of the 3rd century seems much better datation.I remember this tone o be also included in Military cloathning 2 by Graham Sumner.

Second one is "Wall painting of the Soldier-God, Heron From a colored reproduction by Hamzeh Carr Karanis"

Third is claimed to be of ca.300 AD(says risdmuseum.org).


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