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Rare ancient artwork and pictures
#46
West Ham mosaic from Somerset, England, showing the meeting between Aeneas and his son Ascanius (left) and Queen Dido of Carthage (right), as arranged by the goddess Venus (center). Scene from the end of Book I, Vergil’s Aeneid. 4th c. AD. Image from the Vanderbilt Classics Dept.I advise you to search for better quality imagies from this site on your own:


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#47
Many thanks to Damien Deryckère for introducing me to this wonderful mosaic from the house of the Medusa of Alter Do chao in Portugal.How is it possible this marvelous mosaic is not more famous?

http://www.portugalnotavel.com/cesar-vir...o/?lang=en

https://www.academia.edu/1621048/A_Portr..._Portugal_


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#48
Wow. I've never seen this. Check out those greaves! The rest of the gear is pretty good, too.
Pecunia non olet
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#49
This possibly Hybrid armour from Alba Julia is well know I think but I never saw photos of it until now:


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#50
A while back, I tried to post a close-up of the helmet shown on the tombstone of the bucinator Aurelius Surus in the Archaeological Museum in Istanbul and H. Russell Robinson's sketch of what he thought the sculptor was trying to convey.  The old system would not let me do so.  Let's see if the new system is more obliging.

   

   
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#51
It seems to have worked. I'm also not sure I would agree with his interpretation of a Auxiliary helmet. Would you?
Greets!

Jasper Oorthuys
Webmaster & Editor, Ancient Warfare magazine
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#52
(10-31-2015, 05:46 PM)Renatus Wrote: H. Russell Robinson's sketch of what he thought the sculptor was trying to convey.

Wishful thinking, I suspect! The helmet in the relief looks much closer to this one, albeit without the crest:

[Image: gesichtshelm.png]
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#53
(10-31-2015, 05:52 PM)Praefectusclassis Wrote: It seems to have worked. I'm also not sure I would agree with his interpretation of a Auxiliary helmet. Would you?

I can only refer you to his comment set out in my post of 16th May 2014 but see below.

(10-31-2015, 08:47 PM)Nathan Ross Wrote: Wishful thinking, I suspect! The helmet in the relief looks much closer to this one, albeit without the crest

This seems to be a closer parallel but without the skull reinforcements.  That may be Russell Robinson's point.  Without the characteristic reinforcements, it is easier to re-interpret it as an infantry helmet.  However, that was nearly 40 years ago and subsequent research may have established that by the early 3rd century the infantry was using this type of helmet or something similar.

   
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply


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