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Armored underwear???
#1
Got this from FB Gladiator Research, Olak Kueppers. So, what is the murmillo wearing? Armored underwear? Were the gladiator's genitals off limits for hits?


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Richard Campbell
Legio XX - Alexandria, Virginia
RAT member #6?
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#2
That reminds me somewhat of Caius Valerius Crispus:

[attachment=12859]TombstoneofCaiusValeriusCrispus.jpg[/attachment]


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Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#3
Quote:That reminds me somewhat of Caius Valerius Crispus:

I thought of him as well amongst others, including a certain pair of "Bejewelled Battle Shorts" :grin:

Quintus Luccias Filius 1882

[attachment=12861]QuintusLuccias1882small.jpg[/attachment]


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Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#4
Could it just be the texture of the linen, something made to look nice so people would think "Damna, his dominvs is rolling in pecvnia"? Just speculation, I don't have any solid evidence, sorry.
HONOR VICTORIAQVE TECVM

John F.
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#5
Quote:Quintus Luccias Filius 1882

[attachment=12861]QuintusLuccias1882small.jpg[/attachment]
Actually, Quintus Luccius Faustus:

[attachment=12864]TombstoneofQuintusLucciusFaustus.jpg[/attachment]


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Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply
#6
Quite right Faustus it is, who is presumably "quinti filius pollia pollentia"* I'm afraid I dont read latin :wink: but the latin translator I use comes up with "the fifth son of race Pollia"....

*Refers to the text with the drawing from "Tracht und Bewaffnung des römischen Heeres während der Kaiserzeit" 1882

Heres a photo I took of him but I'm unclear as to whether or not its a copy of the original stone as it was a temporary exhibition...

[attachment=12865]QuintusLucciasFsmall.jpg[/attachment]


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Less than 1 minute ago" />   
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#7
Quote:Quite right Faustus it is, who is presumably "quinti filius pollia pollentia"* I'm afraid I dont read latin :wink: but the latin translator I use comes up with "the fifth son of race Pollia"....
The inscription reads:

Q(uintus) Luccius / Q(uinti) f(ilius) Pollia (tribu) / Faustus Pole/ntia mil(es) Leg(ionis) / XIIII Gem(inae) Mar(tiae) / Vic(tricis) an(norum) XXXV / stip(endiorum) XVII h(ic) s(itus) e(st) / heredes f(aciendum) c(uraverunt)

This translates as:

Quintus Luccius Faustus, son of Quintus, of the Pollian voting tribe, from Polentia, soldier of the 14th Legion Gemina Martia Victrix, lived 35 years, served 17 years, lies here. His heirs caused this to be made.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#8
Thanks that makes much more sense.
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#9
I'm starting to suspect that shoulder strap going towards his left side is some kind of supportive or dare I say carry/travel strap for the shield, and not a baldric for the dagger or whatever blade weapon he's got there.

Such an odd angle for the shield - I suspect he's pushing his shield aside to show off the "guns".
….it's almost as if his left leg is bent back in such a way that the shield is resting, if ever so slightly, in the back of his knee or
on the calf. Wish the details hadn't eroded so much, but grateful the thing survives at all.

The depiction of the 'armor' is indeed intriguing as it is baffling.
Andy Volpe - aka - Titus Vulpius Dominicus
"Build a time machine, it would make this [hobby] a lot easier."
andyvolpe.com
Legio III Cyrenaica ~ New England U.S.
(Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Legion-III...7570148688)
Higgins Armory Museum 1931-2013 (worked there 2001-2013)
Collection moved to Worcester Art Museum
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#10
Andy I might be able to get more detail in that the original is larger this is a reduced version, I wondered about the shield as well as it appears to be floating in mid air.....

don't know if this is an improvement, I think I need better editing software...

[attachment=12867]QuintusLucciasdetail.jpg[/attachment]


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Less than 1 minute ago" />   
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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