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Roman Tools; help needed
#1
Salvete!

Getting straight to the point, I am asking all of you to check if you have any info on Roman tools, basicly consisting of drawing/photo with scale and provenance. Perhaps you may have access to a PDF which you could share or link to. I have the Manning catalogue of the British Museum and the St Germain finds book. German and French language is not a problem. 

Why do I ask? Well, I am trying to put together an overview of Roman tools ordered by craft, with as many different documented tools as I can find. Totally inspired by a display at Xanten museum showing a leatherworker's shop.

So, please mail me the info at r.p.wimmersAThotmail.com (replace AT with @) and I will be most gratefull.
Salvete et Valete

Nil volentibus arduum
Return the Romans to Batavian soil!

Robert P. Wimmers
Foundation Archeological Themepark Limes
>http://www.ferrumantica.eu (The NEW Fabrica of Vvlpivs!)
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#2
(07-23-2017, 12:24 PM)Robert Wrote: Salvete!

Getting straight to the point, I am asking all of you to check if you have any info on Roman tools, basicly consisting of drawing/photo with scale and provenance. Perhaps you may have access to a PDF which you could share or link to. I have the Manning catalogue of the British Museum and the St Germain finds book. German and French language is not a problem. 

Why do I ask? Well, I am trying to put together an overview of Roman tools ordered by craft, with as many different documented tools as I can find. Totally inspired by a display at Xanten museum showing a leatherworker's shop.

So, please mail me the info at r.p.wimmersAThotmail.com (replace AT with @) and I will be most gratefull.

Theres a thread on Roman tool cats here, the french ones just posted are pretty good:

http://www.romanarmytalk.com/rat/thread-...#pid345283
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#3
Great, thanks! Was not aware that thread was still alive Big Grin . But please, guys, do send me more stuff, as I want to get a comprehensive overview of the different tools used per craft. As far as I can tell, this is not yet available anywhere, so I thought to try my hand at this.
Salvete et Valete

Nil volentibus arduum
Return the Romans to Batavian soil!

Robert P. Wimmers
Foundation Archeological Themepark Limes
>http://www.ferrumantica.eu (The NEW Fabrica of Vvlpivs!)
Reply
#4
(07-23-2017, 12:24 PM)Robert Wrote: I have the Manning catalogue of the British Museum

Do you mean the Museum of Antiquities, Newcastle upon Tyne?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#5
Manning, W. H. 1985. Catalogue of the Romano-British iron tools, fittings and weapons in the British Museum. London

Is there one for the Museum of Antiquities, Newcastle upon Tyne?? Ahhhh, there is and it is available here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2IR1lF...J1a3c/view Thank you for the tip!!
Salvete et Valete

Nil volentibus arduum
Return the Romans to Batavian soil!

Robert P. Wimmers
Foundation Archeological Themepark Limes
>http://www.ferrumantica.eu (The NEW Fabrica of Vvlpivs!)
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#6
You're welcome. I didn't know about the other one.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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#7
OT I know, but Manning 1985 is also where you can find Scott's pugio typology.

Crispvs
Who is called \'\'Paul\'\' by no-one other than his wife, parents and brothers. :!: <img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_exclaim.gif" alt=":!:" title="Exclamation" />:!:

<a class="postlink" href="http://www.romanarmy.net">www.romanarmy.net
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#8
(07-24-2017, 08:56 AM)Robert Wrote: Great, thanks! Was not aware that thread was still alive Big Grin . But please, guys, do send me more stuff, as I want to get a comprehensive overview of the different tools used per craft. As far as I can tell, this is not yet available anywhere, so I thought to try my hand at this.

Unfortunatly large catalogues of tools dont seem to be that common, with many tools being shown as small finds in excavation reports or specific articles on individual tools and to that end you might try a site called Artefacts which can turn up some very interesting results, though it may give better results if french is used? :

roman shoe anvil ?

And will also give you many references to follow up, in this case:

"G. Jacobi, Werkzeug und Gerät aus dem Oppidum von Manching (Die Ausgr. in Manching, 5),Wiesbaden, 1974."

Sometimes links to specific articles for download are included...

Welcome page : http://artefacts.mom.fr/fr/home.php

More Roman Shoe Anvils

"W. Gaitzsch, Eiserne römische Werkzeuge. Studien zur römischen Werkzeugkunde in Italien und den nördlichen Provinzen des Imperium Romanum (BAR S-78), Oxford 1980, 2 vol."

" M. Pietsch , Die römischen Eisenwerkzeuge von Saalburg, Feldberg und Zugmantel, Saalburg Jahrbuch 39, 1983, p.5-132."

You may have missed this one:

Das Römerkastell Saalburg bei Homburg vor der Höhe, Jacobi 1897 vol2 plates tools

Both Vols:

Saalburg Jacobi 1897

General Museum catalogues and search engines:

British Museum search Collections

Hunterian Museum search Collections

National museum of Scotland Search collections

Catalogue of the collection of London antiquities in the Guildhall Museum
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#9
(07-23-2017, 12:24 PM)Robert Wrote: So, please mail me the info at r.p.wimmersAThotmail.com (replace AT with @) and I will be most gratefull.

Almost forgot about this one!

Pflaum, Veronika (2007): The supposed Late Roman hoard of tools and a steelyard from Vodice near Kalce, in: Arheološki vestnik vol. 58. http://av.zrc-sazu.si/pdf/58/AV_58_Pflaum.pdf
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Robert Vermaat
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FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
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#10
Thanks guys!! Big Grin   Heart
Salvete et Valete

Nil volentibus arduum
Return the Romans to Batavian soil!

Robert P. Wimmers
Foundation Archeological Themepark Limes
>http://www.ferrumantica.eu (The NEW Fabrica of Vvlpivs!)
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#11
Artefacts also works well by site names:

Saalburg on Artefacts

Haltern on Artefacts

Xanten on Artefacts


A new craze is sweeping the Empire:
YoYos, JoJos :-)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c..._F2549.jpg

Big Grin
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#12
Measuring Things:

A Two Foot Ruler/Measure

A Bone Folding One Foot Ruler/Measure

A six inch Ruler/Scriber?

Bronze One Foot folding Ruler from London (One Roman Foot 29.5cm, marked basically and not very accurately in fingers 16=1 foot  and thumbs 12=1 Foot) and a smaller simpler bone measure :

   
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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#13
Thanks Ivor to those links  Smile not just the tools but a nice ring pommel in amongst them and I do like the folding rule chears.
Regards Brennivs  Big Grin
Woe Ye The Vanquished
                     Brennvs 390 BC
When you have all this why do you envy our mud huts
                     Caratacvs
Centvrio Brennivs COH I Dacorivm (Roma Antiqvia)
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#14
(08-01-2017, 08:11 PM)brennivs - tony drake Wrote: Thanks Ivor to those links  Smile not just the tools but a nice ring pommel in amongst them and I do like the folding rule chears.
Regards Brennivs  Big Grin

Your Welcome its always interesting to find new items, I was aware the Bronze or possible Brass hinged Ruler as it is in the London Museum catalogue No3 "London in Roman Times" 1946 pg83-84, the decription mentions that its still Yellow and unpatinated and though I've never seen the original it leads me to believe its more like Brass....

On the divisions the upper side is 16 fingers Digiti, the lower 4 hands Palmi (4 fingers wide 1/4 of a roman foot) and the near side in 12 thumbs Uncia the opposing side has no markings, apparantly this represents the Greek and Latin measurement systems though the markings are not accuratly made.. length 29.5cm from the Walbrook, Princes Street near the Bank of England.

"The London Museum" and "The Guidhall Museum" became "The Museum of London" in the 1970s, and some of the items were spread about to other Museums including the BM, a quick search there turned up the ruler here:

One Foot Rule from London BM

This Artical From A Bone Folding One Foot Ruler/Measure lists 12 examples and includes an almost identical bronze ruler from France, unfortunatly it wont let me add a link in directly:

Feugère 1983c: M. Feugère, Les mesures pliantes du pied romain, en bronze et en os (à propos d'un exemplaire conservé à Roanne). Cah. Arch. Loire 3, 1983, 39-43, 2 fig.


The bone folding rules though incomplete are interesting and could be recontructed I think on the same lines....
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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