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Calling all armchair generals! Boudica's Last Stand.
(05-05-2020, 09:28 PM)John1 Wrote: 3 There is a "Cavalry Dash"

I'm afraid under present circumstances that might be more than my nerves can bear!


(05-05-2020, 09:28 PM)John1 Wrote: 9 The real Church Stowe advocate was edited out and played by some fat, old, inarticulate actor.......

Isn't that always the way?
Nathan Ross
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The only surprise is that a site other than Mancetter gets a mention.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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(05-06-2020, 06:53 AM)Renatus Wrote: The only surprise is that a site other than Mancetter gets a mention.

Yes, that's a plus - although I suppose there's only so many time they can 'discover' the same 'lost battlefield'! But it's impressive that John has managed to present his Church Stowe case so effectively and consistently over the years. As presented here, it looks far more convincing than Mancetter (and I got the impression the programme makers thought so too!).

Still, the chronological fudging they were forced to do on the course of the rebellion was quite telling, I thought. At first the narrator suggests that Paulinus only left Wales "after hearing of the fall of Camulodunum and London", which would have made his trip to London a bit pointless. Sure enough, he then ignores that bit completely and suggests that "after hearing of Boudica's attack on London, Paulinus... pulled back".

So it's left to the Mancetter reenactor to claim that "Paulinus hurtled south to go to London... but made a tactical retreat", which seems to imply the old reconnaissance expedition theory without underlining it.

Needless to say, without this spurious but maddeningly tenacious factoid about Paulinus rushing up and down Watling Street, there remains little reason for him and his army to be in the Midlands when they encounter Boudica and co.

I was amused by the claim that although we don't know the site of the battle, "we do know it's called the Battle of Watling Street"... [Image: tongue.png]
Nathan Ross
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Nathan Ross Wrote:I was amused by the claim that although we don't know the site of the battle, "we do know it's called the Battle of Watling Street"... [Image: tongue.png]

Upon what authority, I wonder.  I'm not aware of 'Proelium in Via Watlingensis' appearing in any of the sources but, as always, I am open to correction.

I've thought of a game to amuse us in lockdown.  'Battle of Watling Street' can be reduced to the acronym 'BOWS'.  What else might these letters stand for?  I'll start it off: Based On Wild Supposition.  Any other ideas?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply
OMG OMG Nathan watched it !!!!!!!!! but sadly has yet to adjust to the level of academic rigour required for the "Adventure Travel" entertainment niche.....

(Badly Orientated War Story)
(Boudicca Obviously Went Sy-co!!!!!)
(Big 'Orrible Warriors Suck)

If you are stuck for something to do in lock down I can thoroughly recommend Margaret Hughes' book- Boudicca at Mancetter. required reading for any student of the topic;

   

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Bored Of World Shutdown,I tried "Battle of Watling St,Based On Wild Supposition".Open-world map,1760 clues and no rules .Review - Game froze on level 1".Badly Orientated War Story",some of the outfits are a little weak.Needs an update 7/10.Best ever game - Holy Grail .
Ian
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John1 Wrote:I can thoroughly recommend Margaret Hughes' book- Boudicca at Mancetter. required reading for any student of the topic;

Although I suspect that the title tells us all we need to know, is this a rational assessment of the merits and demerits of all the likely candidates or is she simply pushing Mancetter?
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply
Her appendices include the case for each alternative site authored by the promoter of that site, so lots of contributors to alternatives.
Reply
That's interesting. The next question is, Where can I get a copy? The Atherstone Civic Society doesn't seem to be selling it anymore.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply
B.O.W.S.- Please help? I am looking for clues> Why did the Celts not use their Chariots ? Maybe they did not need their best weapons due to the overwhelming numerical advantage and wanted to do it the hard way ? The survivors from London also go to Mancetter or die trying. I got that bit,very popular plan i should imagine. While the Romans run away and escape. Fantastic.I got it now. I can watch it again tonight,more popcorn .
Ian
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Boudicca at Mancetter =sales enquiries to go to www.atherstonecivicsociety.co.uk  from where copies can be posted out at £10 plus £3 p&p. 
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Thanks for that, John. I couldn't find anything relevant on the website but have sent an e-mail to the treasurer to whom requests for books can be sent, so we'll see what happens.
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
Reply
(05-09-2020, 04:11 PM)John1 Wrote: Boudicca at Mancetter =sales enquiries to go to www.atherstonecivicsociety.co.uk  from where copies can be posted out at £10 plus £3 p&p. 
     Thanks for that. A new approach always useful.                                                                                                          Are there any other recommended books ,other than The annals of imperial Rome ?
Ian
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(05-09-2020, 06:31 PM)Owein Walker Wrote: Are there any other recommended books...?

I would say that Richard Hingley's Boudica: Iron Age Warrior Queen remains the best study of the revolt I've yet read. Hingley does opt in a kind of luke-warm way for Mancetter, but his book covers the background to the events very thoroughly.

There's also Nicholas Fuentes's excellent paper Boudicca Revisited (From London Archaeologist 1983). This is the one where he suggests a battle site near Staines. More importantly (I think) he convincingly demolishes the theory that Suetonius Paulinus rode down to London for a quick look around before heading back into the Midlands...
Nathan Ross
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(05-09-2020, 08:17 PM)Nathan Ross Wrote:
(05-09-2020, 06:31 PM)Owein Walker Wrote: Are there any other recommended books...?

I would say that Richard Hingley's Boudica: Iron Age Warrior Queen remains the best study of the revolt I've yet read. Hingley does opt in a kind of luke-warm way for Mancetter, but his book covers the background to the events very thoroughly.

There's also Nicholas Fuentes's excellent paper Boudicca Revisited (From London Archaeologist 1983). This is the one where he suggests a battle site near Staines. More importantly (I think) he convincingly demolishes the theory that Suetonius Paulinus rode down to London for a quick look around before heading back into the Midlands...
Ian
Reply


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