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New recruits
Greetings all,

I have been an ancient and medieval military history nerd as far back as I can remember. I'm particularly interested in the Late Imperial and Medieval ("Byzantine") periods of the Roman Empire, in addition to the militaries of Greece, India, and ancient China.

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Paul
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Welcome to the forum Paul.
_________________________________
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR: Forum rules
FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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Greetings, my name is Bruce Mayhugh, I am a life time reenactor/64 years, who attended my first American Civil War event, 14 days after I was born. My father, who later was stationed in Germany took me and my mother to every Roman site he could find including a two week walk along Hadrian's Wall. I never forgotten those times and have been an amateur student ever since. I have been unable to find a Legion to serve with, except the Xth in the Chicago region. While they are a superb bunch of people, they centered on 30BC. I have complete kit for 1st Cent Leg, 1st Cent Aux, and 1st and 3rd Cent. Marine. As I have said, I have found no one to serve with so I have taken the advice of someone here. On facebook I have announced the formation of the II Cohors, Batavi Auxilia. Right now the membership is 2. Recruitment is open to anyone wanting to do 1st Century anything. I am going to pursue my favorite which is the Aux. If anyone is interested, please contact us. I have no desire to be a Centurion so I am also looking for former reenactors who simply want a new start point. please contact me at: Bruce Mayhugh, 63 Sierra Road, Montgomery, IL 60538. 331-262-5857 or at [email protected] or of course on facebook.
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Salve Bruce! Too bad you're not on the east coast. You would be a great asset to Legio XX.
Richard Campbell
Legio XX - Alexandria, Virginia
RAT member #6?
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Photo 
(04-01-2016, 05:20 PM)richsc Wrote: Salve Bruce! Too bad you're not on the east coast. You would be a great asset to Legio XX.

I appreciate that, Multae Gratiae,  I have seen your website, beautiful. Again thank you.
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Hello all!

First off I love Roman, Greek, and Ancient history in general and am going back to college to major in it! I also LOVE DNA testing and have been participating in it a long time. I hope I don't bore you with it... but since this is a history forum... and DNA study is basically your personal history, I figure you guys and girls might be into it!

Second off my name is Charles Burd Weaver IV - a family name of course and I'm a proud 5th generation blue collar man and grew up in the furniture moving business that my family owned. The surname is occupational and comes from somewhere in Northern England or Scotland - per Y-DNA results! More on that later (it has a lot to do with how I found this forum also). I was in born in Pennsylvania in the States!

Long story kind of short - My Mom's side of the family is very Highland/Western Scottish and Gaelic Irish from Upper State New York and Canada (confirmed via autosomal DNA testing - distant cousins etc) including the famous rebel family of the O'Duibhirs (O'Dwyers who participated in two rebellions in the 1600s and several of the Chieftain's extended family served in the Irish Brigade for France as officers - particularly Berwick's Regiment - my Grandfather Philip O'Dwyer was a direct descendant of the Chiefs of the O'Dwyers confirmed via DNA) and Maguires among some others and Clans MacDonald, MacAulay, MacKenzie, MacPherson, and many more! To many to list! Ahh real quick my X-chromosome group is T2b2b, which is currently most common in Ireland and then Scotland.

Dad's side is mostly Scottish and Northern Irish with a bit of Northern/Baltic German mixed with Russian - Volga Germans that's his Mom's mother's father's side! Confusing I know! The rest is a mixture of German from PA and a lot of Irish/Scots. This is going on my extended cousin's list from DNA testing. My middle name comes from the Scottish family of Col. James Burd of Orminston who settled in Pennsylvania and is called by some "the Defender of the Pennsylvania Frontier!" Also some Fergusons (also a Scottish Clan) who served in the Revolutionary War here in the States.

So to the main point and why I found this place (great place it is!). I have done the most testing on my Y-chromosome in honor of my father who died in an accident on the work site. It spurred me on to search for the origin of the long line of men in my family! We have always identified strongly with the male side in my family - coming from a long line of laborers (and soldiers - Weavers have served in the War of 1812 and Civil War/Indian Wars and also WWII that I know of!), but of course we acknowledge we would not be here if not for he ladies :-)! So far I've taken many tests including the Big Y test at FTDNA and a test from National Genographic etc. I've been able to match my Y-DNA with several historical figures, or at least families. First off I'm a member of the R1b-U106 DF98 group called the King's Cluster because it contains about 300 predicted (about 100 tested) families who share a Bronze Age relationship with the House of Wettin from Thuringia... also known as the House of Windsor or Saxe-Gotha. Some modern day descendants of that male line have been tested positive for the DF98 Y-DNA marker. This marker/subgroup under the Y-DNA marker U106 clusters in modern day testers around the Upper Rhine (though the French side is not well tested - there are surely some there). Also three descendants of the House of Bourbon have been tested positive for the Y-DNA marker U106 and Z381 under that. They are predicted to possibly be DF98 positive, but they haven't tested for it yet. If they ever do we (the group who does the research) may be able to connect the tribal origins of both Wettin and Bourbon if they are further related on the Y-line.

Next is a group called S1911  under DF98. I share this with the descendant families of a Norman knight's family from Cheshire in NW England. An Odard de Dutton is documented as coming over from Normandy after the conquest and was a vassal of the Earl of Chester. The Dutton family owned Dutton in Cheshire and also inherited the estate of Warburton in Cheshire later. That is how we know we are on the right track with the y-line, since both a Dutton and Warburton family match on several Y-DNA markers, but split around the time this new estate would have been acquired. These families got very lucky since historical records rarely match up per the Y-line like this.

Now under the S1911 group there are several sub groups which I share with a smaller number of families mostly from the British Isles. This includes the group S4004 and FGC14814. This is where it gets interesting! With the recent DNA testing performed on the Headless Romans of Driffield Terrace - we were able to determine that I matched skeleton #3 at 6 Driffield Terrace (the tallest guy out of them all at about an estimated 183 cm - the heavyweight skeleton per the Back from the Dead program - guy with the butterfly fracture etc) on Y-DNA markers first found in my Y-chromosome! He matches me about as well as my modern day matches! They were old to begin with... but matching an 1800 year old guy from Eboracum. I share the FGC14818 with about three other families and we all share that with 6drif-3... so naturally my interest in all things Romano-British skyrocketed when I heard that some of the lead theories where that some of these guys may have been either Gladiators or Soldiers. Considering that my Y-DNA group DF98 clusters very well (and clustering apparently is important even today in regard to ancient remains - my S4004 group clustered in Northern England/Scotland and surprise! We find an ancient match in Northern England!) along the Upper Rhine - most likely an auxiliary soldier if we didn't arrive before the Romans in Britain (which is still a possibility). We need testing from ancient remains along the Rhine... that would be ideal... then we could narrow down the tribe or tribes.

I hope I didn't write too much... but I figured you history people might take an interest in and also see the possibilities of combining all types of historical disciplines with testing of both modern and ancient DNA - especially Y-DNA because it never recombines... only mutates.

Cheers!!

Charlie
Charles Weaver
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Welcome to the forum Charlie - dna is fascinating stuff indeed.
_________________________________
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR: Forum rules
FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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Hi there,

I was a frustrated amateur ancient historian (Ba/MA) and got into re-enactment. After a few years I took my interest to the online community with a blog, twitter account and more recently a youtube channel.

I don't get into my lorica as much as I would like to but once a year I visit a local school to spend a day with the year 7s helping with their 'Roman week'. Kids seem to love testing how 'real' the lorica is.

Anyway - on here to learn and perhaps make a friend or two. Hope to input where I can. 

cheers

Neil
My blog

My vlog

@ancientblogger

Hope you enjoy!

Neil
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Hi everybody!  I'm from Phoenix, AZ.  I've been interested in Rome for about 10 years now.  I got started with the SCA in about 2005, and I picked Roman when pushed for a persona.  I guess the formalized military appealed to me (being active duty myself).  Before long I got really interested in how high the Roman's achieved before much of it was lost to time.  I look forward to exploring many of those aspects in time. 

Over the years one central point keeps coming up when I try and research a topic: RAT.  I figured after bumping into the forum so many times I should join and start participating.  I'm still playing in the SCA, but I hope some of you more "hardcore" guys won't hold that against me.  Currently I'm going by Marcus Annius Corbulo (if that's close to correct).
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Hi guys,
I've been interested in the Romans as long as I can remember, I moved to a place about a mile from Hadrian's Wall a few years ago and really started taking an interest in the local history.
Dan
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This site may interest you:

http://www.hadrianicsociety.com/
Michael King Macdona

And do as adversaries do in law, -
Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends.
(The Taming of the Shrew: Act 1, Scene 2)
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(07-03-2016, 07:11 PM)Erik Disregard Wrote: Hi everybody!  I'm from Phoenix, AZ.  I've been interested in Rome for about 10 years now.  I got started with the SCA in about 2005, and I picked Roman when pushed for a persona.  I guess the formalized military appealed to me (being active duty myself).  Before long I got really interested in how high the Roman's achieved before much of it was lost to time.  I look forward to exploring many of those aspects in time. 

Over the years one central point keeps coming up when I try and research a topic: RAT.  I figured after bumping into the forum so many times I should join and start participating.  I'm still playing in the SCA, but I hope some of you more "hardcore" guys won't hold that against me.  Currently I'm going by Marcus Annius Corbulo (if that's close to correct).

Salve Erik,

I just moved to Phoenix and, although I have been a member on RAT a few years, I did not live near any Roman reenact groups. I am looking to become involved in reenactment, preferably Roman, so please let me know what you find. And, if you don't mind, could you tell me a bit about SCA?

Best, 

Nathan
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65 yr old retired USAF, living along Florida's N Gulf coast Hobbyist blacksmith x 11 years 
Have been asked to set up an AD 43 Roman forge by a friend, for an event next April.
I have been reading and studying Iron for Eagles, Roman Imperial Armour and Roman Military Equipment, as well as lurking around here for the last two months.
After reading the many post here, and studying the books, would I be correct in concluding that most of the iron/steel produced by the Romans would be about the equivalent of a modern rail road spike, except for the rear exception, or am I totally off track?
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First of all Welcome, this probably isnt the place to put this... so I would request a MOD move it too an appropriate section please...

Roman iron varies a good deal for example the huge hoard of iron nails from Inchtitchil, some 875,000 varying in size from 2.5-15 inches long, had a carbon content varying from 0.05 - 0.9%, 17 samples provided carbon contents of 0.02 - 0.64% from a beam from Cattarick made from forge welding several blooms weighing in total some 128 kg... I dont know how this compares with a modern US RR spikes though...

Personally I would use something I felt was appropiate for the job in hand...
Ivor

"And the four bare walls stand on the seashore. a wreck a skeleton a monument of that instability and vicissitude to which all things human are subject. Not a dwelling within sight, and the farm labourer, and curious traveller, are the only persons that ever visit the scene where once so many thousands were congregated." T.Lewin 1867
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Salve,

- where are you from? Originally from Devon, UK, but now living in Odense, Denmark.

- how'd you become interested in Rome? As a longtime wargamer and enthusiastic military historian, how could I not be interested in Rome Wink

- why are you here? To learn, share experiences, and chat.

- do you re-enact, are you a student, an academic professional, or..? Short answer is, yes  Big Grin

As well as having done some western style Viking reenactment in Denmark and a bit of HEMA (longsword and I.33), I'm with the 15th or Kings Light Dragoons (Hussars) in UK (aka XVLD), and am helping set up a new Napoleonic group in Denmark. Through others members of that group, I have just enlisted in LEGIO VI VICTRIX COHORS II CIMBRIA as a legionary, but would hope to develop a mounted interpretation in due course. I'm also nearing the end of a part time PhD in Medieval History at Queen Mary University of London.

Kind regards,

Stephen
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