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On This Day...
#1
Salvete Omnes!

I thought we used to have a thread of this name, but I've done a search and come up blank...Anyway...

ante diem sextum Idus Iulias: Ludi Apollinares...10th July: Lidi Apollinares...

Dis Manibus,

On this day in 138 AD, the emperor Hadrian died of an illness at Baiae at age 62. The Emperor is dead, long Live the Emperor!

[Image: hadrian.jpg]


Valete,

Nerva.
MARCVS VLPIVS NERVA (aka Martin McAree)

http://www.romanarmy.ie

Legion Ireland - Roman Military Society of Ireland
Legionis XX Valeria Victrix Cohors VIII

[email protected]

[email protected]
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#2
A good idea, this thread!
Jona Lendering
Relevance is the enemy of history
My website
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#3
If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.
M. Demetrius Abicio
(David Wills)

Saepe veritas est dura.
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#4
Quote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.

Or he was on drugs lot of the time like Marcus Aurelius... Tongue He does look like a "proper Emperor", though.
(Mika S.)

"Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris? Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior." - Catullus -

"Nemo enim fere saltat sobrius, nisi forte insanit."

"Audendo magnus tegitur timor." -Lucanus-
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#5
Quote:
M. Demetrius:3luegjz5 Wrote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.
Or he was on drugs lot of the time like Marcus Aurelius...
I bet you can back that up with references to proper sources. :wink:
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Robert Vermaat
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THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
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#6
Quote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.

Indeed, but was it carved after the death of Antinous? Hadrian became a very different man after his (Antinous) death.

Valete Omnes,

Nerva.
MARCVS VLPIVS NERVA (aka Martin McAree)

http://www.romanarmy.ie

Legion Ireland - Roman Military Society of Ireland
Legionis XX Valeria Victrix Cohors VIII

[email protected]

[email protected]
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#7
Quote:
Sardaukar:2gewd27o Wrote:
M. Demetrius:2gewd27o Wrote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.
Or he was on drugs lot of the time like Marcus Aurelius...
I bet you can back that up with references to proper sources. :wink:

About which one, Hadrianus or M. Aurelius? :twisted: I doubt anyone has accused formed of dabbling with poppy, but he must have been surely tempted.

I don't want to be a Caesar,
Stroll about among the Britons,
Lurk about among the . . . .
And endure the Scythian winters,

he wrote back:

I don't want to be a Florus,
Stroll about among the taverns,
Lurk about among the cook-shops,
And endure the round fat insects.


8)
(Mika S.)

"Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris? Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior." - Catullus -

"Nemo enim fere saltat sobrius, nisi forte insanit."

"Audendo magnus tegitur timor." -Lucanus-
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#8
For those interested in a recent biographical treatment of the emperor, I highly recommend Anthony Everett's 'Hadrian and the Triumph of Rome'.
Lindsay Powell
[url:1j6646pm]http://www.Lindsay-Powell.com[/url] website
@Lindsay_Powell twitter
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#9
Quote:
Sardaukar:2x1x225i Wrote:
M. Demetrius:2x1x225i Wrote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.
Or he was on drugs lot of the time like Marcus Aurelius...
I bet you can back that up with references to proper sources. :wink:

I think the groundbreaker for this idea was Africa, T. W. in "The Opium Addiction of Marcus Aurelius", Journal of the History of Ideas 22 (1961), 97-102.

Others are more cautious. Birley says:

Quote:He [Marcus] could not take anything in the daytime, except some of the medicine called theriac. This he took not so much because he was afraid of anything, but because he was suffering from a chest and stomach condition. It is said that the practice of taking this drug enabled him to endure both this and other illnesses. The point of Dio's remark about theriac is that the word means literally 'antidote', and emperors and other rulers in antiquity not infrequently took some form of antidote to give them immunity from poison. The medicine which Marcus took was prescribed for him by Galen. It contained opium. Galen records that Marcus stopped taking because it made him drowsy, but then found he could not sleep, and had to take a regular dose again. This may indicate that he had become an opium addict. But Marcus did not become a helpless addict like Thomas de Quincey, and the attempt to discover traces of the opium eater's confused and distorted imagination in the Meditations has not proved very convincing.

Birley, Marcus Aurelius: A Biography

Sorry for getting off track. Great idea for a thread!
David J. Cord
http://www.davidcord.com
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#10
Quote:
Vortigern Studies:110rs1do Wrote:
Sardaukar:110rs1do Wrote:Or he was on drugs lot of the time like Marcus Aurelius...
I bet you can back that up with references to proper sources. :wink:
I think the groundbreaker for this idea was Africa, T. W. in "The Opium Addiction of Marcus Aurelius", Journal of the History of Ideas 22 (1961), 97-102.
Thanks David! That was helpful.
_________________________________
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR: Forum rules
FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
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#11
12th of July...ante diem quartum Idus Iulias...

And of course, on this day in 100 B.C. the great Caius Julius Caesar was born. Felix dies tibi sit Caesar!...

Valete,

Nerva.
MARCVS VLPIVS NERVA (aka Martin McAree)

http://www.romanarmy.ie

Legion Ireland - Roman Military Society of Ireland
Legionis XX Valeria Victrix Cohors VIII

[email protected]

[email protected]
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#12
Quote:If that bust is a good likeness, he had fierce eyes.

I think he looks quite content in that bust to be honest.
Visne partem mei capere? Comminus agamus! * Me semper rogo, Quid faceret Iulius Caesar? * Confidence is a good thing! Overconfidence is too much of a good thing.
[b]Legio XIIII GMV. (Q. Magivs)RMRS Remember Atuatuca! Vengence will be ours!
Titus Flavius Germanus
Batavian Coh I
Byron Angel
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#13
ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Augustas...18th July...

On this day in 64 AD two-thirds of Rome burned while Emperor Nero allegedly fiddled. Of course we know Nero actually played a Banjo...even thought he wasn't even in Rome, must have been an Air Guitar then :lol:

Valete,

Nerva.
MARCVS VLPIVS NERVA (aka Martin McAree)

http://www.romanarmy.ie

Legion Ireland - Roman Military Society of Ireland
Legionis XX Valeria Victrix Cohors VIII

[email protected]

[email protected]
Reply
#14
ante diem tertium decimum Kalendas Augustas...20th July...

On this day in 365 AD, a great earthquake struck the eastern Mediterranean and destroyed the Roman city of Kourion on the island of Cyprus.

Valete Omnes,

Nerva.
MARCVS VLPIVS NERVA (aka Martin McAree)

http://www.romanarmy.ie

Legion Ireland - Roman Military Society of Ireland
Legionis XX Valeria Victrix Cohors VIII

[email protected]

[email protected]
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#15
On this day (well, yesterday at the moment of posting)... :wink:

On this day in 356 BC the temple of Artemis in Ephesos, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, was destroyed. Considered by Antipater of Sidon as one of the 'Seven Wonders of the World', it was built over a period of 120 years and set on fire by one Herostratus, who apparently wanted to become famous. He succeeded. Of course the temple was rebuilt and again destroyed in 267 (or 268) AD by the Goths. Final destruction came in 401 AD, when a mob led by St. John Chrysostom tore it down. The stones were used in construction of other buildings, some of the columns ending up in the Hagia Sophia.

On that very same day in 356 BC, Alexander the Great was born.

On this day 285 AD the Tetrachy was born, as the emperor Diocletian appointed Maximian as Caesar and co-ruler.

On this day in 365 AD, a tsunami hit Alexandria, killing probably 50.000 inside and outside the city.
_________________________________
Robert Vermaat
MODERATOR: Forum rules
FECTIO Late Roman Society
THE CAUSE OF WAR MUST BE JUST
(Maurikios-Strategikon, book VIII.2: Maxim 12)
[Image: artgroepbutton.jpg]
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